Researchers uncover mechanisms to easily dry, redisperse cellulose nanocrystals

Man and two women in a lab readying a sample of cellulose

By Maria R. Lucas

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Cellulose nanocrystals — bio-based nanomaterials derived from natural resources such as plant cellulose — are valuable for their use in water treatment, packaging, tissue engineering, electronics, antibacterial coatings and much more. Though the materials provide a sustainable alternative to non-bio-based materials, transporting them in liquid taxes industrial infrastructures and leads to environmental impacts.

Smart chip senses, stores, computes and secures data in one low-power platform

Smart chip - low-powered platform

By Mariah Chuprinski

Digital information is everywhere in the era of smart technology, where data is continuously generated by and communicated among cell phones, smart watches, cameras, smart speakers and other devices. Securing digital data on handheld devices requires massive amounts of energy, according to an interdisciplinary group of Penn State researchers, who warn that securing these devices from bad actors is becoming a greater concern than ever before.  

Randy McEntaffer

Randy McEntaffer

Department Head of Astronomy & Astrophysics and Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics

(e) rlm90@psu.edu
(o) 814-863-6091
526 Davey Lab

https://www.mcentaffergroup.psu.edu/
Osama Awadelkarim

Osama Awadelkarim

UNESCO Chair Professor and Director of the Center for Nanotechnology Education and Utilization

(e) ooa1@psu.edu, (e) ooaesm@engr.psu.edu
(o) 814-863-1773
309E Earth and Engineering Science

Daniel Lopez

Daniel Lopez

Director of the Nanofabrication Lab
Liang Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

(e) ovl5064@psu.edu
(o) 814-867-1575
N-321 Millennium Science Complex