Researchers uncover mechanisms to easily dry, redisperse cellulose nanocrystals

Man and two women in a lab readying a sample of cellulose

By Maria R. Lucas

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Cellulose nanocrystals — bio-based nanomaterials derived from natural resources such as plant cellulose — are valuable for their use in water treatment, packaging, tissue engineering, electronics, antibacterial coatings and much more. Though the materials provide a sustainable alternative to non-bio-based materials, transporting them in liquid taxes industrial infrastructures and leads to environmental impacts.

Linxiao Zhu

Linxiao Zhu

John J. and Jean M. Brennan Clean Energy Early Career Professor Assistant Professor

(e) lqz5242@psu.edu
(o) 814-865-2519
143 EEL Building

https://sites.psu.edu/lzhu/
Ayusman Sen

Ayusman Sen

Verne M. Willaman Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Chemical Engineering

(e) axs20@psu.edu
(o) 814-863-2460
440 Chemistry Building

https://sites.psu.edu/sengroup/
Suzanne Mohney

Suzanne Mohney

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering

(e) sem2@psu.edu, (e) mohney@ems.psu.edu
(o) 814-863-0744
N-209 Millennium Science Complex

Scott Medina

Scott Medina

Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering

(e) shm126@.psu.edu
(o) 814-863-4758
511 Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Building

https://sites.psu.edu/medinalabgroup/
Daniel Lopez

Daniel Lopez

Director of the Nanofabrication Lab
Liang Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

(e) ovl5064@psu.edu
(o) 814-867-1575
N-321 Millennium Science Complex