Some everyday materials have memories, and now they can be erased

Materials have memory

By Gail McCormick

Some solid materials have a memory of how they have previously been stretched out, which impacts how they respond to these kinds of deformations in the future. A new Penn State study lends insight into memory formation in the foams and emulsions common in food products and pharmaceuticals and provides a new method to erase this memory, which could guide how materials are prepared for future use.

Zoubeida Ounaies

Zoubeida Ounaies

Dorothy Quiggle Career Developmental Professorship Professor of Mechanical Engineering

(e) zxo100@psu.edu
(o) 814-867-4443
157 Hammond Building

https://limc2.psu.edu/
George Lesieutre

George Lesieutre

Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs and Professor of Aerospace Engineering

(e) gal4@psu.edu
(o) 814-863-0103
102B Hammond Building

http://www.personal.psu.edu/~gal4/
Ryan Harne

Ryan Harne

James F. Will Career Development Associate Professor

(e) rqh5445@psu.edu
(o) 814-865-2519
336 Reber Building

https://lsvr.psu.edu/