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eMaterials Newsletters

The Materials Research Institute Newsletter eMaterials

2017 eMaterials

November eMaterials

Synthetic material acts like a insect cloaking device
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October eMaterials

A safe optical fiber for delivering light and drugs into the body
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September eMaterials

New biomaterial could replace plastic laminates, greatly reduce pollution
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August eMaterials

Energy storage solution combines polymers and nanosheets
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July eMaterials

Rooftop concentrating photovoltaics win big over silicon
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June eMaterials

Low cost, scalable water-splitting fuels the future of hydrogen economy
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May eMaterials

Stenciling with Atoms in Two-Dimensional Materials
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April eMaterials

Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequences
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March eMaterials

Earning GOLD for Graduate Research Presentation
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February eMaterials

The Best of 2016 in Materials at Penn State
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January eMaterials

New Technique Uses Immune Cells to Deliver Anti-Cancer Drugs
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2016 eMaterials

2016 December eMaterials

Controlling the Properties of Matter in Two-Dimensional Crystals
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2016 October eMaterials

New carbon-nanotube tool for ultra-sensitive virus detection and identification
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2016 September eMaterials

Lowering the heat makes new materials possible while saving energy
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2016 August eMaterials

“Ideal” Energy Storage Material for Electric Vehicles Developed
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2016 July eMaterials

Ultrasensitive Sensor Using N-doped Graphene
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2016 June eMaterials

New, better way to build circuits for the world's first useful quantum computers
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2016 May eMaterials

UNDER PRESSURE: New technique could make large, flexible solar panels more feasible
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2016 April eMaterials

The power of computation for exploring materials
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2016 March eMaterials

Use a Cell Phone to do 3D Imaging
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2016 February eMaterials

Inspiration from Shiny Fish Skin
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2016 January eMaterials

Sensor to Detect at Single-molecule Level
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A Cheap, Disposable Device for Diagnosing Disease

The development of a reusable microfluidic device for sorting and manipulating cells and other micro/nano meter scale objects will make biomedical diagnosis of diseases cheaper and more convenient in regions where medical facilities are sparse or cost is prohibitive.
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Flexible dielectric polymer can stand the heat

Easily manufactured, low cost, lightweight, flexible dielectric polymers that can operate at high temperatures may be the solution to energy storage and power conversion in electric vehicles and other high temperature applications.

On-Chip Processor the First Step in Point-of-Care Asthma and Tuberculosis Diagnostics

A device to mix liquids utilizing ultrasonics is the first and most difficult component in a miniaturized system for low-cost analysis of sputum from patients with pulmonary diseases such as tuberculosis and asthma.

Diode a few atoms thick shows surprising quantum effect

A quantum mechanical transport phenomenon demonstrated for the first time in synthetic, atomically-thin layered material at room temperature could lead to novel nanoelectronic circuits and devices, according to researchers at Penn State and three other U.S. and international universities.

Material scientist xxploring ways to improve efficiency of solar cells

Researching a specialized category of solar cells - referred to as "tandem" solar cells - that have the possibliity of increasing, perhaps even doubling the efficiency of solar cells.

Graphene membrane could lead to better fuel cells, water filters

An atomically thin membrane with microscopically small holes may prove to be the basis for future hydrogen fuel cells, water filtering and desalination membranes, according to a group of 15 theorists and experimentalists.

High efficiency concentrating solar cells move to the rooftop

Ultra-high efficiency solar cells similar to those used in space may now be possible on your rooftop thanks to a new microscale solar concentration technology developed by an international team of researchers.

"Mind the Gap" Between Atomically Thin Materials

For the first time, Penn State researchers grew a single atomic layer of tungsten diselenide on a one- atom-thick substrate of graphene with pristine interfaces between the two layers.