Morgan Advanced Materials Carbon Lecture Series (Virtual)

Fall Semester 2021

REGISTRATION REQUIRED for each lecture. A Zoom link will be provided once registered.

Friday, September 17, 2021 / 3:00-4:30pm EST
Dr. Ryan M. Paul
Carbon Materials Scientist
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Presentation: “125 Years of Synthetic Graphite (1896 – 2021)”

Friday, October 22, 2021 / 12:00-1:30pmpm EST   REGISTER
Dr. Nikhil Koraktar
John A. Clark and Edward T. Crossan Chair Professor, Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York USA
Presentation: “Porous Graphene Networks for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes"

 


Friday, October 22, 2021 / 12:00-1:30pm EST
Dr. Nikhil Koraktar
John A. Clark and Edward T. Crossan Chair Professor, Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York USA
Presentation: “Porous Graphene Networks for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes"

Abstract: 

Lithium metal anodes are known to possess a very high theoretical capacity of 3842 mAh/g in lithium batteries. However, the use of metallic lithium leads to extensive dendritic growth that poses serious safety hazards. In this talk, I will discuss the defect-induced plating of metallic lithium within the interior of a porous graphene network. The network acts as a caged entrapment for lithium metal that prevents dendritic growth, facilitating safe cycling of the electrode. Such plating of lithium metal within the interior of the porous graphene structure results in very high specific capacities in excess of 850 mAh/g. Extended testing for over 1,000 charge/discharge cycles indicates excellent reversibility and coulombic efficiencies above 99%. Further, the open-pore structure of the porous graphene network facilitates efficient intercalation kinetics even at ultrafast charge/discharge rates of > 100C. This enables porous graphene anodes to exhibit fast charging capability in addition to high gravimetric energy density. The main limitation of such porous graphene structures is their low volumetric energy density and low first cycle coulombic efficiency. I will discuss some possible strategies to overcome these limitations.

RELATED PUBLICATIONS:

(1) R. Mukherjee, A. V. Thomas, D. Datta, E. Singh, J. Li, O. Eksik, V.B. Shenoy and N. Koratkar, “Defect Induced Plating of Lithium Metal within Porous Graphene Networks,” Nature Communications 5, 3710 (2014).
(2) R. Mukherjee, A. V. Thomas, A. Krishnamurthy, N. Koratkar, “Photo-Thermally Reduced Graphene as High Power Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries,” ACS Nano 6, 7867-7878 (2012).
(3) L. Li, S. Basu, Y. Wang, Z. Chen, P. Hundekar, B. Wang, J. Shi, Y. Shi, S. Narayanan, N. Koratkar, “Self-heating–induced healing of lithium dendrites,” Science 359, 1513-1516 (2018).

 

 

Bio:

Nikhil Koratkar is the John A. Clark and Edward T. Crossan Chair Professor at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). His research has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and application of advanced materials. Professor Koratkar is a winner of the NSF CAREER Award (2003), RPI James M. Tien '66 Early Career Award (2005), the Electrochemical Society's SES Young investigator Award (2009), American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award (2015), IIT-Bombay Distinguished Alumnus Award (2019), and the RPI William H. Wiley 1866 Distinguished Faculty Award (2021). In 2016, Koratkar was elected a Fellow of the ASME. He has published a book on graphene as an additive in composite materials and over 200 archival journal papers. In 2018, Clarivate Analytics named him in their highly cited researchers list (top 1% by citations). Koratkar serves as an Editor of the journal CARBON (Elsevier). He also serves on the advisory board of a start-up company aimed at commercializing next-generation energy storage solutions. 

 

 

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